Frequently Asked Questions – static content

Welcome, my name is Jack Lowe. I use photography, sound recordings and social media to tell the story of The Lifeboat Station Project, an idea I first conceived in 2012.

As you can imagine, I’m regularly asked lots of questions, so I’ve made this special page collating a selection of them with my answers below.

I hope it’s useful!


WHO CAME UP WITH THE IDEA FOR THE LIFEBOAT STATION PROJECT?

I came up with the idea for The LSP and first presented it to the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) in 2012. My proposal was initially turned down while the RNLI worked on photographer Nigel Millard’s fine book, Courage on our Coasts.

Over the next year or two, I further honed and refined the idea before presenting it again in the Spring of 2014. I was invited to RNLI HQ in Poole for further talks and my idea was then approved by the RNLI, who gave me permission to photograph their crews.

Click here for further reading.


HOW BIG IS THE PROJECT?

The LSP is one of the largest projects ever attempted in the history of photography. I am visiting all 238 RNLI lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland. It’ll take around six to seven years to complete and there’ll be about 1000 finished glass plates photographs.

Click here to see the task in hand.


WHY ARE YOU DOING IT?

I’m doing something I believe in, following my heart and turning my childhood passions for photography and the RNLI into a meaningful and engaging body of work for all to enjoy.

Click here for further reading.


WHAT’S YOUR NORMAL JOB?

There’s no normal job — this is it! I’ve brought my previous chapters in photography to a close and thrown everything into The LSP. There is no Plan B.

It’s been a high risk strategy — to “give up my day job” — but I believe the only way to achieve my original vision is to totally commit myself to it.

Now I find myself in the midst of a classic scenario — I’ve gone too far to turn back — and nor would I want to. I utterly believe in the Project, but making such a huge commitment has not always been easy!

Click here to read All or Nothing.


WHERE AND WHEN DID YOU START THE LSP?

Logistical preparations for the first mission (LSP1) began in the winter of 2014. I hit the road for the first time on 11th January 2015, ready to photograph my first station on 12th January 2015.

The first station was Southwold on the East Anglian coast in Suffolk.

Click here to read the blog post I wrote at the time.


ARE YOU GOING TO EVERY RNLI LIFEBOAT STATION?

Yes. There are currently 238 operational RNLI lifeboat stations and I’m going to every single one of them.

Click here to see the task in hand.


HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE?

I’m currently documenting around 30 lifeboat stations per year.

238 divided by 30 = 7.9 years

If I manage to keep going at the current pace, I expect to finish by the end of 2022. That means it will have taken me around eight years from start to finish!


ARE YOU GOING TO MY LOCAL STATION?

I certainly am! If there’s an RNLI station near you, I’ll be visiting it at some point (if I haven’t already).


WHERE CAN I FIND OUT THE LATEST ITINERARY?

I tend to work about a month ahead and announce the upcoming itinerary to my Patrons first and then on social media.

You can find the latest itinerary using the interactive Mission Map.


HOW CAN I FOLLOW THE JOURNEY?

You can follow the journey here:


HOW’S THE PROJECT FUNDED?

For the first two years of its life, I entirely self-funded the Project with money raised through the The LSP Shop — in essence, my own form of crowdfunding.

Since Autumn 2016, I’ve been fortunate enough to receive a small licence fee from the RNLI in return for the charity using my images to promote their work. However, the contribution covers less than half of my production costs, so there’s still a steep hill to climb when making the photographs and sound recordings.

In November 2017, there was a turning point for the Project when I launched my Patreon page.

By pledging monthly amounts in exchange for rewards, The LSP’s Patrons provide a much more stable foundation for me to continue making this unprecedented RNLI archive.

It’s also a way for the extra-keen to be extra-rewarded!


Become a Patron of The Lifeboat Station Project on Patreon


The combination of these things helps to keep The LSP on the road:


HOW CAN I SUPPORT THE LSP?

The financial peaks and troughs of this journey have sometimes been terrifying. It would not be an exaggeration to say that, at times, I have felt completely despondent and wondered if I could continue.

However, I have been buoyed by the support of the amazing people who love following the journey and appreciate what it takes to keep it (and me!) on the road. If you’d like to be one of them, there are lots of ways to help, from buying Limited Edition Prints to signing up to become a Patron.

Whether it’s a one-off tee shirt purchase in The LSP Shop or a monthly donation, every little helps. I’m very aware that we all have different financial commitments, so I’ve tried to offer something suitable for everyone. (If you feel there’s something else I could do, please let me know).

Click here to find out how to become a supporter.


WILL THERE BE AN EXHIBITION?

Yes. I’m building towards a major exhibition of the work once it’s all completed.

I dream of presenting the photographs and sound recordings in a huge, high profile venue. I imagine the lifeboat stations will be displayed in geographical order around the exhibition space with Neena (my mobile darkroom) as a centrepiece along with an all-weather lifeboat.

As ever, I’m daring to dream!

In the meantime have a look at the Events page for regional events and exhibitions as my work is regularly shown around the country.


WILL THERE BE A BOOK?

Yes. I have a literary agent and we’re looking at what form this book might take. I’m hoping for a stunning coffee table book containing all the work. I’d like to include some of the sound recordings too along with fold-out maps and a foreword by someone special.

Did you know…? You can pledge on Tier 3, 5, 6 or 7 on my Patreon page to receive a signed copy of the final book!


DO YOU GIVE TALKS ABOUT THE LSP?

I regularly give talks all round the country. Previous venues have included photographic societies, sailing clubs, RNLI events, institutions, festivals, cinemas and even Apple Stores.

You can find upcoming and current events on this page.

Previous media and event highlights can be found here.

If you’d like to book me for a talk, please click here to get in touch.


DO YOU HAVE AN ONLINE SHOP?

Yes, indeed. Sales through The Shop form part of the Project’s lifeblood.

Click here for Limited Edition Prints, the famous LSP Keyring, mugs, postcards and even clothing for adults and children and adults.


CAN I BUY PRINTS OF YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS?

You certainly can. I sell Limited Edition Prints of every photograph featured in the Galleries.

Only 50 prints will ever be made from each photograph, making them truly historical artworks to be treasured.

The sale of these prints helps to fund The Lifeboat Station Project and keep it on the road.

Click here to start browsing.


HAVE ANY FILMS BEEN MADE ABOUT YOUR WORK?

Two short films have been made about my work, one by Peter Naylor filmmaker and RNLI crew member at Hunstanton, and the other by the RNLI Film and Image Team.

Click here to see them along with some other offerings on the Cinema page.


DO YOU HAVE ANY STAFF?

I wish! I’d love to have one or two people helping me full-time one day.

In the meantime, I look after social media, admin, communications, logistics, this website, product development, marketing, fulfilling orders, scanning, printing, packaging, shipping, archiving, driving, washing up, vacuuming…oh, and photography!


WHO HELPS YOU ON THE ROAD?

I have a pool of kind friends who volunteer their time to help me on the road. I work alone if they’re not available and LSP fans who simply come along to say hello often get roped in as well!


YOU MAKE SOUND RECORDINGS TOO?

That’s right. I love making sound recordings as much as photography — they’re both great ways of story-telling and picture-making. Combine the two and the results can be very powerful indeed.

Click here to listen to my podcast.


HOW OLD IS YOUR CAMERA?

The camera was made in around 1905 by Thornton Pickard in Altrincham.

However, the process I use is even older, dating from 1851. So, the camera is Edwardian and the process is Victorian.


HOW DO YOU MAKE PRINTS FROM THE GLASS PLATES?

The photographic plates that I make are known as ambrotypes, which are direct positives on glass.

That means they weren’t shot as negatives (from which many prints could be made) but the intention was/is to place a black surface behind them (like cotton velvet, for example) so that they can be displayed as a positive rather than a negative.

It’s that glass plate — or ambrotype — that would have been given to the person commissioning the photograph ‘back in the day’.

Ambrotypes are like one-off sculptures, so the only practical way to reproduce them in the modern era is to scan them and make digital prints. And that’s exactly what I do.

Incidentally, you may or may not know that my previous chapter in photography involved working within the very highest standards of digital imaging. I spent twelve years as a printmaker and retoucher to other photographers, designers and artists. So, I see this project as the culmination of many skills learnt over the years.


DOES THE RNLI GET ANY MONEY FROM YOU?

Not directly. The RNLI is enjoying such a positive impact from The LSP that it’s currently geared the other way round — the RNLI give me a small license fee so that they can use my images to promote their work.

But ultimately, the RNLI will benefit financially in many ways, not least from book sales once the work is complete (a percentage of the purchase price will go directly to the charity).

By way of thanks for the volunteers’ efforts, Print No.1 of the crew photograph and Print No.1 of the Coxswain/Helm portrait are donated to each lifeboat station.

Click here to read a message from the RNLI published in May 2018.


IT LOOKS LIKE THE PROJECT’S TAKEN ITS TOLL AT TIMES. WHY NOT TAKE A REST?

This is my full-time job, so if I stop, my income stops.

It has been hard, though, that’s for sure. I want The LSP to succeed so much, and I really went for it at the beginning! But I like to think that, as the journey has progressed, I’ve got better at making sure I plan rest days and make sure I look after myself.

However, I’m also aware that I don’t want the Project to lose momentum or take people’s engagement for granted, so I try very hard to make sure that if you’re kind enough to follow my journey, I will make it worth your while.

I update my social media feeds regularly and am always thinking of new ways to bring my adventures alive — from podcasts to demonstration videos!

It’s worth mentioning, too, that the nature of the photographic process I use means I tend to hit the road through the Spring and Summer, when there is more available UV light, so there is also a seasonal limitation to what I can do and when.


DO YOU HAVE ANY TIPS FOR PEOPLE NEW TO ART COLLECTING?

I do indeed. I soon became very aware that many of my followers had never purchased Limited Edition Prints before, so they might need a little guidance.

With that in mind, I came up with a few tips for buying my work.

Click here to read them.


I WOULD LIKE TO GET MY PRINT FRAMED. ANY SUGGESTIONS?

If you’ve bought a lovely new print, you might now be wondering how to frame it.

Click here for my framing suggestion.


WHERE DID YOU GET THE AMBULANCE?

I bought my decommissioned NHS ambulance in 2014 on eBay!

Click here to read the story.


DO YOU SLEEP IN THE AMBULANCE WHEN YOU’RE ON THE ROAD?

Absolutely not — Neena’s a mobile darkroom rather than a motorhome, so I might wake up with a headache at best.

When I’m not carrying photographic materials on board, she’s very comfortable to sleep in, though!


WHAT IS WET PLATE COLLODION?

Wet plate collodion is one of the very early photographic processes and was invented by a clever chap called Frederick Scott Archer in 1851.

Although the process isn’t very convenient — certainly by modern standards — it was perhaps the first ‘mainstream’ photographic process, popular until the 1890s.

Very simply put, the process involves using a piece of glass or metal (the plate) to carry various chemicals that have combined to make a light sensitive film on the plate.

The sensitised plate is carried from the darkroom (the converted ambulance in my case) to the camera in a light-tight plate holder. The plate is then exposed in the camera and immediately carried back to the darkroom for processing.

Time is of the essence as the whole process has to be started and completed within a 10 to 15 minute window…this digital thing will never catch on!

This video from George Eastman House sums it up well.


WHY ARE YOU USING SUCH AN OLD PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESS?

After a long time working at the highest level in digital photography, I started using wet plate collodion so that I could get back in touch with what it takes to make a photograph. After all, that’s what I really loved about photography as a youngster.

Although the finished plates are extraordinarily beautiful, that’s not the primary reason I’m using this old process: wet plate collodion has proved to be the key to unlocking engagement with the lifeboat volunteers as well as my online followers, enabling me to tell the story that was waiting to be told in a compelling way.

In short, I feel it’s important to remember that every good project starts with the story, not with the way it’s made.

Click here to learn more about the Project.


HOW DID YOU LEARN TO USE THIS PROCESS?

Like most things in life, I’m self taught. I read lots of books and watched lots of videos.

Once I felt I was ready to make a plate, I reached out to a couple of people I knew in the community. Jonathan Keys kindly filled in the gaps and helped me to make my very first plate in December 2013.

Tony Richards and Mark Voce have helped me since and the rest is down to experience — after making hundreds and hundreds of plates, I’ve certainly learnt a thing or two about what it might have been like to work as a photographer in the 1800s!


HAVE YOU GOT ANY TIPS FOR USING WET PLATE COLLODION?

I reckon I could probably write a book on all the things I’ve learned about using wet plate collodion (hmmm…there’s a thought)!

In the meantime, here are five rules I’ve made for my journey that you might find helpful too:

  1. Method and cleanliness: Always be disciplined with the process and never cut corners. Ever.
  2. Always be in the task: If you’re in the middle of doing something, never be distracted while you’re doing it. Wait until you’ve safely finished the task before doing the next thing.
  3. Lean, sit or both: People must always be leaning against or sitting on something to ensure stability when being photographed. With the best will in the world, a person is very unlikely to stay absolutely still for the duration of a long exposure if free-standing.
  4. Stay outside: When making portraits using available light, never position people more than a metre or so inside the threshold of a building, no matter how large the opening (the roll up doors of a lifeboat station, in my case). Although you may think there’s plenty of light, there won’t be enough for wet plate collodion once venturing into the depths of a UV shadow that’s imperceptible to humans.
  5. Never use pontoons: No matter how still you think the water is, it’s highly unlikely that a floating pontoon will be a stable enough platform on which to make a long exposure. They twist and yaw with the slightest waves, making a long exposure almost impossible!

If you’d like to ask Jack a question or you think something should be added to this list, please get in touch:

CONTACT JACK